We use only the finest ingredients to make your Seedy Crackers.  Here are some of the ways our seeds (and crackers!) support your health journey.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sunflower Seeds (Helianthus annuus)

 

We use only AAA quality, High shine 100% natural Sunflower Seeds in our crackers. Sunflower Seeds take care of your hunger, while also enhancing your health by supplying significant amounts of vitamin E, magnesium and selenium. In addition, sunflower seeds are a good source of copper and vitamin B1, manganese, phosphorus, vitamin B6, folate and niacin.

 

Anti-Inflammatory and Cardiovascular Benefits from Sunflower Seeds' Vitamin E

 

Sunflower seeds are an excellent source of Vitamin E, the body's primary fat-soluble antioxidant. Vitamin E travels throughout the body neutralizing free radicals that would otherwise damage fat-containing structures and molecules, such as cell membranes, brain cells, and cholesterol. By protecting these cellular and molecular components, vitamin E has significant anti-inflammatory effects that result in the reduction of symptoms in asthma, osteoarthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis, conditions where free radicals and inflammation play a big role. Vitamin E has also been shown to reduce the risk of colon cancer, help decrease the severity and frequency of hot flushes in women going through menopause, and help reduce the development of diabetic complications.

 

In addition, vitamin E plays an important role in the prevention of cardiovascular disease. Vitamin E is one of the main antioxidants found in cholesterol particles and helps prevent free radicals from oxidizing cholesterol. Only after it has been oxidized is cholesterol able to adhere to blood vessel walls and initiate the process of atherosclerosis, which can lead to blocked arteries, heart attack, or stroke. Getting plenty of vitamin E can significantly reduce the risk of developing atherosclerosis. In fact, studies show that people who get a good amount of vitamin E are at a much lower risk of dying of a heart attack than people whose dietary intake of vitamin E is marginal or inadequate.

 

Sunflower Seeds' Phytosterols Lower Cholesterol

 

Phytosterols are compounds found in plants that have a chemical structure very similar to cholesterol, and when present in the diet in sufficient amounts, are believed to reduce blood levels of cholesterol, enhance the immune response and decrease the risk of certain cancers.

 

Phytosterols beneficial effects are so dramatic that they have been extracted from soybean, corn, and pine tree oil and added to processed foods, such as "butter"-replacement spreads, which are then touted as cholesterol-lowering "foods." But why settle for an imitation "butter" when Mother Nature's nuts and seeds are a naturally rich source of phytosterols—and cardioprotective fibre, minerals and healthy fats as well?

In a study in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, researchers published the amounts of phytosterols present in nuts and seeds commonly eaten in the United States.

 

Sesame seeds had the highest total phytosterol content (400-413 mg per 100 grams), and English walnuts and Brazil nuts the lowest (113 mg/100grams and 95 mg/100 grams). (100 grams is equivalent to 3.5 ounces.) Of the nuts and seeds typically consumed as snack foods, sunflower seeds and pistachios were richest in phytosterols (270-289 mg/100 g), followed by pumpkin seeds (265 mg/100 g). Seedy Crackers contain all these seeds: Sesame, Sunflower and Pumpkin, so you are covered there!

 

Calm Your Nerves, Muscles and Blood Vessels with Sunflower Seeds' Magnesium

 

Sunflower seeds are a good source of Magnesium. Numerous studies have demonstrated that magnesium helps reduce the severity of asthma, lower high blood pressure, and prevent migraine headaches, as well as reducing the risk of heart attack and stroke.

 

Magnesium is also necessary for healthy bones and energy production. About two-thirds of the magnesium in the human body is found in our bones. Some help gives bones their physical structure, while the rest is found on the surface of the bone where it is stored for the body to draw upon as needed.

 

Magnesium counterbalances calcium, thus helping to regulate nerve and muscle tone. In many nerve cells, magnesium serves as Nature's own calcium channel blocker, preventing calcium from rushing into the nerve cell and activating the nerve. By blocking calcium's entry, magnesium keeps our nerves (and the blood vessels and muscles they innervate) relaxed. If our diet provides us with too little magnesium, however, calcium can gain free entry, and the nerve cell can become overactivated, sending too many messages and causing excessive contraction. Insufficient magnesium can thus contribute to high blood pressure, muscle spasms (including spasms of the heart muscle or the spasms of the airways symptomatic of asthma), and migraine headaches, as well as muscle cramps, tension, soreness and fatigue.

 

Improved Detoxification and Cancer Prevention from Sunflower Seeds' Selenium

 

Sunflower seeds are also a good source Selenium, a trace mineral that is of fundamental importance to human health. Accumulated evidence from prospective studies, intervention trials and studies on animal models of cancer has suggested a strong inverse correlation between selenium intake and cancer incidence. Selenium has been shown to induce DNA repair and synthesis in damaged cells, to inhibit the proliferation of cancer cells, and to induce their apoptosis, the self-destruct sequence the body uses to eliminate worn out or abnormal cells.

 

In addition, selenium is incorporated into the active site of many proteins, including glutathione peroxidase, which is particularly important for cancer protection. One of the body's most powerful antioxidant enzymes, glutathione peroxidase is used in the liver to detoxify a wide range of potentially harmful molecules. When levels of glutathione peroxidase are too low, these toxic molecules are not disarmed and wreak havoc on any cells with which they come in contact, damaging their cellular DNA and promoting the development of cancer cells. Its selenium richness is another reason that sunflower seeds make a great snack.

 

The sunflower's Latin scientific name, Helianthus annuus, reflects its solar appearance since helios is the Greek word for sun, and anthos is the Greek word for flower.

 

Organic Sesame Seeds (Sesamun indicum)

 

We use only Organic Raw Sesame Seeds in our crackers. Sesame seeds are not only an excellent source of copper and a very good source of manganese, but they are also a good source of calcium, magnesium, iron, phosphorus, vitamin B1, zinc, molybdenum, selenium, and dietary fibre. In addition to these important nutrients, sesame seeds contain two unique substances: sesamin and sesamolin. Both of these substances belong to a group of special beneficial fibres called lignans and have been shown to have a cholesterol-lowering effect in humans and to prevent high blood pressure and increase vitamin E supplies in animals. Sesamin has also been found to protect the liver from oxidative damage.

 

Rich In Beneficial Minerals

 

Sesame seeds are an excellent source of copper, a very good source of manganese, and a good source of magnesium, calcium, phosphorus, iron, zinc, molybdenum, and selenium. This rich assortment of minerals translates into the following health benefits:

 

Copper Provides Relief for Rheumatoid Arthritis

 

Copper is known for its use in reducing some of the pain and swelling of rheumatoid arthritis. Copper's effectiveness is due to the fact that this trace mineral is important in a number of anti-inflammatory and antioxidant enzyme systems. In addition, copper plays an important role in the activity of lysyl oxidase, an enzyme needed for the cross-linking of collagen and elastin—the ground substances that provide structure, strength and elasticity in blood vessels, bones and joints.

 

Magnesium Supports Vascular and Respiratory Health

 

Studies have supported magnesium's usefulness in:

  • Preventing the airway spasm in asthma

  • Lowering high blood pressure, a contributing factor in heart attack, stroke, and diabetic heart disease

  • Preventing the trigeminal blood vessel spasm that triggers migraine attacks

  • Restoring normal sleep patterns in women who are experiencing unpleasant symptoms associated with menopause
     

Calcium Helps Prevent Colon Cancer, Osteoporosis, Migraine and PMS

 

In recent studies, calcium has been shown to:

  • Help protect colon cells from cancer-causing chemicals

  • Help prevent the bone loss that can occur as a result of menopause or certain conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis

  • Help prevent migraine headaches in those who suffer from them

  • Reduce PMS symptoms during the luteal phase (the second half) of the menstrual cycle
     

 

Zinc for Healthy Bones

 

Another reason for both men & women to make zinc-rich foods such as sesame seeds a regular part of their healthy way of eating is bone mineral density. Although osteoporosis is often thought to be a disease for which postmenopausal women are at highest risk, it is also a potential problem for older men. Almost 30% of hip fractures occur in men, and 1 in 8 men over age 50 will have an osteoporotic fracture. A study of 396 men ranging in age from 45-92 that was published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found a clear correlation between low dietary intake of zinc, low blood levels of the trace mineral, and osteoporosis at the hip and spine.

 

Sesame Seeds' Phytosterols Lower Cholesterol
 

Phytosterols are compounds found in plants that have a chemical structure very similar to cholesterol, and when present in the diet in sufficient amounts, are believed to reduce blood levels of cholesterol, enhance the immune response and decrease the risk of certain cancers.

 

Phytosterols beneficial effects are so dramatic that they have been extracted from soybean, corn, and pine tree oil and added to processed foods, such as "butter"-replacement spreads, which are then touted as cholesterol-lowering "foods." But why settle for an imitation "butter" when Mother Nature's nuts and seeds are a naturally rich source of phytosterols—and cardioprotective fibre, minerals and healthy fats as well?

In a study in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, researchers published the amounts of phytosterols present in nuts and seeds commonly eaten in the United States.

 

Sesame seeds had the highest total phytosterol content (400-413 mg per 100 grams), and English walnuts and Brazil nuts the lowest (113 mg/100grams and 95 mg/100 grams). (100 grams is equivalent to 3.5 ounces.) Of the nuts and seeds typically consumed as snack foods, pistachios and sunflower seeds were richest in phytosterols (270-289 mg/100 g), followed by pumpkin seeds (265 mg/100 g).

 

Pumpkin Seeds (Cucurbita pepo)

 

We use Grade AAA, Shine Skin Pumpkin Seeds in our Crackers. 

 

Pumpkin seeds contain a wide variety of antioxidant phytonutrients, including the phenolic acids hydroxybenzoic, caffeic, coumaric, ferulic, sinapic, protocatechuic, vanillic and syringic acid; and the lignans pinoresinol, medioresinol and lariciresinol. Pumpkin seeds also contain health-supportive phytosterols, including beta-sitosterol, sitostanol and avenasterol. Pumpkin seeds are a very good source of phosphorus, magnesium, manganese and copper. They are also a good source of other minerals including zinc and iron. In addition, pumpkin seeds are a good source of protein.

Like cantaloupe, watermelon, cucumber, and squash, pumpkins and pumpkin seeds belong to the gourd or Cucurbitaceae family. Within this family, the genus Cucurbita contains all of the pumpkins (and their seeds). The most common species of pumpkin used as a source of pumpkin seeds are Cucurbita pepo, Cucurbita maxima, Cucurbita moschata, and Cucurbita mixta.

 

Health Benefits:

 

Antioxidant Support
 

The diversity of antioxidants in pumpkin seeds makes them unique in their antioxidant support. Pumpkin seeds contain conventional antioxidant vitamins like vitamin E. However, not only do they contain vitamin E, but they contain it in a wide variety of forms. Alpha-tocopherol, gamma-tocopherol, delta-tocopherol, alpha-tocomonoenol and gamma-tocomonoenol are all forms of vitamin E found in pumpkin seeds. These last two forms have only recently been discovered, and they are a topic of special interest in vitamin E research, since their bioavailability might be greater than some of the other vitamin E forms. Pumpkin seeds also contain conventional mineral antioxidants like zinc and manganese. Phenolic antioxidants are found in pumpkin seeds in a wide variety of forms, including the phenolic acids hydroxybenzoic, caffeic, coumaric, ferulic, sinapic, protocatechuic, vanillic, and syringic acid. Antioxidant phytonutrients like lignans are also found in pumpkin seeds, including the lignans pinoresinol, medioresinol, and lariciresinol.
 

 

Mineral Support

 

Plants that have a close relationship to the soil are often special sources of mineral nutrients, and pumpkin (and their seeds) are no exception. Pumpkin seeds are a very good source of the minerals phosphorus, magnesium, manganese, and copper and a good source of the minerals zinc and iron.

 

Pumpkin seeds have long been valued as a special source of the mineral zinc, and the World Health Organization recommends their consumption as a good way of obtaining this nutrient. 

 

 

 

 

Seedy Crackers is a subsidiary of Fiona Paton Design

Contact Us:

ph: +(852) 9195 6960

fiona@seedycrackers.co

FEHD Food Manufacture/Distributor Registration No: TR-17-001366

Food Factory Licence No: 2915803228​

© 2017 by Seedy Crackers

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